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Kaka 06-03-2014 11:31 PM

Re: The GRE and Grad School
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ShutTheSuccop (Post 4175467)
Ever considered the international business program?...you already have the second language for the program

A lot of my friends were on that program and is really hard to get in, plus I'm not very good at math and I truly like communications.

Gaichon 06-05-2014 09:05 AM

Re: The GRE and Grad School
 
GRE is not hard - took it then got an M.S., now I'm about to start a pretty highly ranked MBA, but got out of having to take the GMAT (which was why I hesitated so long). Luckily its an EMBA and the only program that particular school has not requiring GMAT.

Not sure I'd have done too well on the GMAT without some real prep - took the GRE cold and didn't think it was tough at all. Depends on your strengths.

ra742002 06-05-2014 09:17 AM

Re: The GRE and Grad School
 
My suggestion to you, having just finished my MEd in Teaching through USC. Work, save enough money to pay cash for a couple of classes at a time (will really help if the curriculum is online). Don't incur any more debt if you can help it. I got my MEd in 4 years, while teaching and coaching football and softball. I took classes in the summer, 1 in the fall, and 2 every spring. We paid cash for it, and it's a great feeling.

SECgamecock453 06-05-2014 10:15 AM

Re: The GRE and Grad School
 
I want to go back to school but not for what I got an undergraduate degree in (Business Admin. - Finance). Would love to get into Computer Info. Systems/Computer Science something to that effect but no idea how that would work since I would be missing a lot of the core undergrad classes before even going for the masters...

RoyalAir 06-05-2014 10:31 AM

Re: The GRE and Grad School
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SECgamecock453 (Post 4176458)
I want to go back to school but not for what I got an undergraduate degree in (Business Admin. - Finance). Would love to get into Computer Info. Systems/Computer Science something to that effect but no idea how that would work since I would be missing a lot of the core undergrad classes before even going for the masters...

A coworker of mine is doing exactly this, and is doing it through the University of Arizona online. Supposedly, it's a very quality program in Info Systems. May be worth a look.

markp_vip 06-05-2014 10:40 AM

Re: The GRE and Grad School
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ra742002 (Post 4176404)
My suggestion to you, having just finished my MEd in Teaching through USC. Work, save enough money to pay cash for a couple of classes at a time (will really help if the curriculum is online). Don't incur any more debt if you can help it. I got my MEd in 4 years, while teaching and coaching football and softball. I took classes in the summer, 1 in the fall, and 2 every spring. We paid cash for it, and it's a great feeling.

Good advice! Or even better try and get your employer to pick up some of the tab. My current employer reimburses up to $4,400 per year as long as you can show the education is related to your current position and a value to the company.

markp_vip 06-05-2014 10:44 AM

Re: The GRE and Grad School
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SECgamecock453 (Post 4176458)
I want to go back to school but not for what I got an undergraduate degree in (Business Admin. - Finance). Would love to get into Computer Info. Systems/Computer Science something to that effect but no idea how that would work since I would be missing a lot of the core undergrad classes before even going for the masters...

I did my undergrad in Econ and my Master's in IT. I don't think you can get an MS in Computer Science without a BA in it, but IS or IT is doable.

TKE226 06-09-2014 09:43 AM

Re: The GRE and Grad School
 
Just remember that the letters after your name indicating you have a masters degree don't mean anything (well it means you spent a lot of money on your education) unless you work harder after to get the job you want.

And there is a trade off too that you should probably think about. Consider if you did not get your Masters and went into the work world...in a few years if you worked hard your salary could be XX% higher because you worked hard and showed your value to your employer. On the other hand if you went back to school got your Masters and came out with a higher salary, great, but look what you spent to get it....and it could be where you would be if you entered the workforce and worked hard...

I understand that Masters degrees in some areas are necessary. But some of the most successful people I know in my field either have limited college education or none...


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