View Single Post
Old 12-24-2013, 06:28 AM   #11
Spurticus
IT'S MY GAMEFACE !!
 
Spurticus's Avatar
 
Male

2008 Cockytalk Award: 2008 Cockytalk Award - Given for: 2008 Best Football Poster Nascar Contest Segment 2 Winner: Winner - Given for: Winning Nascar Segment 2 Football Poster 2005: Award given for the best football related poster - Given for: being voted the best football poster of 2005 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Columbia (Gaston Area ), SC
Posts: 28,475
CockyCash: 100200
Spurticus is USC mascot materialSpurticus is USC mascot materialSpurticus is USC mascot materialSpurticus is USC mascot materialSpurticus is USC mascot materialSpurticus is USC mascot materialSpurticus is USC mascot materialSpurticus is USC mascot materialSpurticus is USC mascot materialSpurticus is USC mascot materialSpurticus is USC mascot material
Default Re: Country music today

REAL Country Music was killed off by the same thing that killed REAL
Rock n Roll. Corporate Industry involvement into the medium for the
purpose of advertisement and profit. It "basically" started (or got out of
hand) with the circus that was Frampton Comes Alive. The Record Company
hype months before it's release, the paid radio/TV executives to push
the Album, and the overplaying the tracks from the album once it was
released. It set records for the most costly album to produce, but it also
set records for the amount of cash made from sales and concert attendance.
It was the beginning of the end. After Frampton Comes Alive, concert ticket
sales went from about $15.00 a ticket in/around 1974-75 to somewhere in
the $35.00 range in 1975-76 and grew steadily almost every 6 months or so.
Every major name in Rock that put out an album also had major corporate
sponsors attached to the album itself and/or the tour to support the
new album release. Rock bands/artists were starting to sign multi million
dollar contract deals not only with the Record Companies, but with
Corporations like Ford Motor Company, Budwiser, Sony, Pepsi etc....
in order to get their name on the Album, the Tour and the band's music.
Music went from entertainment for the average blue collar Joe, to
a special event for the upper middle class.

Country music soon followed in it's footsteps. Country Music in the 90s
and early 2000s was what Rock was in the early to late 80s. Overhyped
younger artists who's main goal was to produce a couple or singles on
every album that would get the sponsors name out there, and something
they could make a cool video out of to play into the ground on MTV (rock)
and CMT (for Country music). ... Music in general was successful or
not by way of growth numbers on a spread sheet rather than record sales
and call in requests to the DJs on the air. Now everytime a Name act
takes the stage, it's done behind months of hype and advertisement,
and online ticket sales of prices "BEGINING" at $85.00-$100.00 range, to
see another name doing pretty much the same act as the other guy / gal
just did a few months earlier. Only with a different corporate sponsor, and
a little variation in the light show.

This same thing has invaded other forms of entertainment as well.
NASCAR is the main one that comes to mind. If followed the same model
as Rock Music starting in the 90s and it's pretty much killed off a once
solid form of middle American pastime.
__________________
Spurticus is offline   Reply With Quote